Coloring the Knot themed 4"x6" Postcard with message/photo pocket

Ink up that pen and sharpen that pencil!

This morning is all about two of my favorite acts: writing to friends and some contemplative coloring. In the end really is about coloring with a purpose: meaningful correspondence.
For my opening post on this new blog, I would like to just walk you through this mornings Advanced Card Making process. Although there is no absolute way to color or collage your card (there is only your preferred way), I did commit to the following color layers: print the card, apply a light ink wash, ink the outlines, colored in with ink, then use color pencils to finish my design.

Suggestion #1: After printing off my page, I will let the ink cure a bit before applying water and inks. I have found this to greatly reduce or completely remove any smudging of the printer's ink.
When I am ready to start, I frequently begin with a light ink wash. I have found that this is a great way to establish the general color scheme I want to pursue and lays out my first layer of coloring. The more colors layers can give the overall visual effect more depth and variety.

Color layer 1: Applying a light ink or water color wash. This establishes the general color theme I wish to pursue.

Color layer 1: Applying a light ink or water color wash. This establishes the general color theme I wish to pursue.

 

At this point I do not worry about staying in the lines, nor do I worry about any color overlapping. I personally find this to create more visual interest in the end. There will me more mediums applied over this and will either cover up or blend together these "inaccuracies".

Color layer 1 detail: with the wash I do not worry about overlapping color nor do I worry about staying in the lines.

Color layer 1 detail: with the wash I do not worry about overlapping color nor do I worry about staying in the lines.

After the ink or water color washes have dried, I tend to move on to the markers. There are so many options out there that there is no reason to find an ink that doesn't meets your mood or message you wish to convey. Recently, I have been on a metallic marker and gel pen kick. In particular I like how the sheen of the metal lifts itself away from the very flat look of the ink wash. Before I color in shapes I do all of my outlining. Here is where I can emphasis the hints of lines that were there in the download and ignore others. Also this is the time it does matter about staying in the lines, so I add variety with different colors of lines.

Color layer 2: Ink is a great layer to add next. Metallic ink does a great job at elevating itself above the flat appearance of the ink wash.

Color layer 2: Ink is a great layer to add next. Metallic ink does a great job at elevating itself above the flat appearance of the ink wash.

With the ink laid, I do like to finish with the colored pencils. Quality colored pencils do such an excellent covering over/ blending into so many different mediums. This is the most relaxing time of the coloring process for me. Pretty much everything has been defined and now I am just building up my personal interest in the image. A little bit here and a little bit there. I take my time and let by blood pressure drop.
Suggestion #2: Frequently hold the image at a distance. This perspective of your work will give you a valuable perspective. One that will reveal the next areas to color in.

Last color layer: colored pencils do such an excellent job covering pigment over so many different mediums. 

Last color layer: colored pencils do such an excellent job covering pigment over so many different mediums. 

With the coloring finished, I am now ready to elevate this card from a one dimensional colored page to a 3-dimentional vehicle to the most personalized of mail.
Cutting along the light red dotted line that was actually retraced with my colored inks of choice, I am now ready for the folding.

After coloring comes the origami-like construction. Lets fold.

After coloring comes the origami-like construction. Lets fold.

 

Simply fold over the two tabs and glue.

Postcard making: simply fold the two tabs and glue. Now we have made the pocket.

Postcard making: simply fold the two tabs and glue. Now we have made the pocket.

Now assembled, a glance at the front and back of my card.

I am now ready to do my writing. In another post,  I will talk about this part and all of the options of what can go inside the pockets. I will also talk about finishes and laminate options (or none if preferred).